Category Archives: State Profiles

Featured IFPS Program: Tennessee

(Tennessee is the fifth state in our series of featured IFPS programs. See more at State Profiles.)

Tennessee was one of the first states to implement IFPS statewide. After discontinuing IFPS for a time, Tennessee is now again considering statewide implementation. All eyes are on a federally-funded pilot project that is testing IFPS with families involved in substance abuse. The project is also a collaborative that includes mental health, substance abuse, and child welfare.

1. How long has your state offered IFPS? Share about the history of IFPS in your state.

Ours is a partnership of a state mental health and substance abuse authority, state child welfare, community-based mental health center, and nonprofit research organization. The partnership began in 2012 when we applied for a collaborative grant with the Administration for Children and Families.

2. Why does your state/agency offer IFPS?

We had previous experience with IFPS as a statewide service designed to keep children safely and successfully in their homes rather than in state custody. A grant opportunity became available that allowed us to test the IFPS model on a smaller scale and evaluate its efficiency in families where parental substance abuse is an issue.

3. What qualities do you want to see in providers of IFPS, both at the agency and at the therapist level?

We look for a culturally competent team of master’s level clinical staff that is comfortable being family focused and values “family” as a necessary contributor to children’s wellbeing. Staff must be open to IFPS values and competencies, and have a passion for direct service delivery. Keeping children safe and making a positive difference for them and their families must be staff’s top priority.

4. What qualities do you look for in an IFPS therapist?

The data have shown that families are more hopeful after experiencing IFPS. There is some decay after six to 12 months, but families still remain more hopeful than at baseline. Families indicate appreciation to their therapist for new skills and connections. Families also report a more positive attitude around child welfare since IFPS.

5. How do you measure success of IFPS services? How successful are IFPS services in your state?

We examine the extent to which we have been able to reduce entry into custody, as well as re-entry reductions for re-unification cases. We are further collecting data on increased social and emotional development of children and families using the North Carolina Family Assessment Scales.

6. What advice and resources can you share with other states that want to establish a strong IFPS program?

Contact the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) for guidance. They will work with you in determining how to establish a strong IFPS program. Their IFPS Toolkit, available on the NFPN website, is also very useful, as are other site resources.

Contact:
Dr. Edwina Chappell
Principal Investigator
TIES Project

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Posted by Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, National Family Preservation Network

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Featured IFPS Program: Missouri

(Missouri is the fourth in our series of featured IFPS programs. See more at State Profiles.)

1.How long has your state offered IFPS? Share about the history of IFPS in your state.

IFPS State Administrator:
The first family preservation service program began in Missouri in 1997. The first IFPS project began in 1988 with the primary focus on abused and neglected children in imminent risk of removal. In 1989, four additional projects began providing services, including multiple county projects in both rural and urban county areas. By October of 1995, IFPS programs were operating in 35 project sites covering all of Missouri’s 115 counties, and the City of St. Louis. The name of the program was changed to Intensive In-Home Services (IIS) in 1998. Today, IIS services are available to all 45 circuits within the State of Missouri.
IFPS Provider:
Gillis began providing Family Preservation Services/IIS in Jackson County in 1991 with five In-Home Specialists. We worked in partnership with the Children’s Division Services and The Children’s Place to provide short-term Intensive In-Home crisis services to families with one or more children at risk of removal. During this time we have provided support to the Children’s Division in efforts to educate the community and referral sources regarding the program. In 1997, when The Children’s Place relinquished their contract, Gillis added five Specialists and one and a half supervisors to their staff. In 1998 the Children’s Division changed the program name to Intensive In-Home Service and Gillis was awarded that contract. Gillis has maintained the IIS Jackson County contract and was awarded the most recent contract in 2012 for 12 IIS Specialists.

2. Why does your state/agency offer IFPS?

IFPS State Administrator:
IFPS has helped reduce the number of children who enter out of home care by keeping kids safely at home. In fiscal year 2013, 77.1% of children receiving IFPS services avoided out of home care. This allows children to remain safely with their families and allows staff to have smaller caseloads. In addition, families who have had IFPS intervention are less likely to have their children come into care up to 12 months after intervention than a family at risk who did not have IFPS intervention. IFPS has also drastically reduced the occurrence of child abuse and neglect during IFPS intervention and at 3, 6, and 12 months after intervention. The program has helped to save a substantial amount of money. The cost of the IFPS program is minimal compared to the direct cost and staff time incurred by the Children’s Division.
IFPS Provider:
To help children remain safely with their families and to prevent them from going into the foster care system. We also believe that all families have the ability to make change. We love preventative programs!

3. What qualities do you want to see in providers of IFPS, both at the agency and at the therapist level?

IFPS State Administrator:
The provider must have an overriding goal of protection of children through the enhancement of family capabilities. Safety of all family members is the concern of Intensive In-home Services; however, safety of the child is the primary consideration. The provider’s services must focus on assisting in crisis management and restoring the family to an acceptable level of functioning.The therapist shall provide services designed to keep children safe from abuse and neglect and improve family permanency.
IFPS Provider:
We look for someone who is compassionate, hopeful, caring, strength-based, non-judgmental, and flexible. The person must have the ability to be assertive, with solid engagement skills, and a belief that families have the ability to change, We look for therapists who can teach others, with crisis management, and have the ability to understand the importance of self-care.

4. What qualities do you look for in an IFPS therapist?

IFPS State Administrator:
Families have problem-solving and other life skills, focusing on assisting in crisis management and the specific issues placing the child at risk of removal from their home. In addition, the IFPS program helps families establish linkages with formal and informal community services.
IFPS Provider:
We see families who are more hopeful about their family unit and their future, have fewer feelings of stress, more organized households, better communication skills, better use of appropriate discipline, utilize supports/supportive services, better understanding of their children’s needs, and children are now in an environment that is healthier and safer.

5. How do you measure success of IFPS services? How successful are IFPS services in your state?

IFPS State Administrator:
The overarching goal of IIS is to protect children through the enhancement of family capabilities. As a result, the agency tracks the number of substantiated reports three months following the IIS intervention. According to the IIS contract, 85% of families who have received IIS intervention shall not have confirmed child abuse/neglect within the first three months following the completion of IIS intervention. For the last three years, contractors and state staff have exceeded this requirement with only .12% having a substantiated report within 3 months for SFY10 and SFY11, and .06% for SFY13. This data demonstrates success of the program mission to protect children from abuse and neglect. The data also supports the efficacy of the program to teach families skills to improve family functioning and allow them to remain intact.
IFPS Provider:
Self-reports from our families, feedback from CD worker, observations of positive change, skills taught being put to use, decreased risk factors /, family has increased resources/supports, intact families at our 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups, and no more substantiated hotline reports.

6. What advice and resources can you share with other states that want to establish a strong IFPS program?

IFPS State Administrator:
I would encourage states to develop an IFPS program. The program has proven effective in preventing children from entering foster care. Missouri is willing to share information regarding our model, lessons learned, and data which may be beneficial to states interested in developing an IFPS program.
IFPS Provider:
Get to know the local community resources, network, partner with Children’s Division, get to know resources within your own agency to help families, , be strengths-based. Remember your supervisor and your co-workers are there to be a support, and remember self-care…this can be a stressful position.

Contacts:
IFPS State Administrator
Crystal Wilson (E-mail: Crystal.L.Wilson@dss.mo.gov)
Program Development Specialist
Children’s Division – Central Office

IFPS Provider
Rachel Hodson
Director of In-Home Services
Gillis

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Posted by Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, National Family Preservation Network

Featured IFPS Program: North Carolina

(North Carolina is the third in our series of featured IFPS programs. See more at State Profiles.)

1.How long has your state offered IFPS? Share about the history of IFPS in your state.

IFPS State Administrator:
North Carolina’s Intensive Family Preservation, based on the Homebuilders® model, was first offered in North Carolina in October of 1991. In January 1994 an automated data collection system was incorporated as part of provider reporting. The North Carolina Family Assessment Scale (NCFAS V. 1.4) was first implemented during the spring of 1995.North Carolina strives to ensure that IFPS services are as effective as possible. During the spring of 1998, a reliability and validity study of the NCFAS 1.4 was conducted which resulted in the development and implementation of the NCFAS 2.0 which is still used in NC, although we will begin the use of the NCFAS+G by the end of State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2014. In SFY 2000 a retrospective study of the effectiveness of IFPS was conducted and that study indicated that IFPS is effective in preventing or delaying out of home placement in comparison to traditional child welfare services.In part due to findings from the retrospective study, North Carolina revised IFPS policies effective 2001 to standardize the definition of “imminent risk” and restrict referrals to only those from County Divisions of Social Services, Mental Health Agencies and Department of Juvenile Justice. NC also began the process of offering services statewide by dividing the state into regions. Agencies were required to serve all counties in their region by SFY 2004–2005, making IFPS services truly available statewide.From SFY 1992 to 2007 the NC Division of Social Services funded Dr. Ray Kirk to conduct evaluations of the IFPS program including an Annual Report and a Cost-Benefit Analysis. The program was consistently shown to be very cost-effective compared with placement costs had children been placed out of the home. Additionally, for those children who were placed out of home following IFPS, those children typically were served in a more appropriate placement and at a lower level of care than they would have required had they not had IFPS.
IFPS Provider A:
Eckerd has been providing IFPS for over 3 years. Our office is in Lumberton, NC and we serve Region 7 that includes: Anson, Hoke, Moore, Montgomery, Scotland, Richmond, Cumberland, and Johnston Counties.IFPS Provider B:
Our agency has been providing IFPS services since 2004. We started with only 2 counties then expanded in 2009/10 to 5 additional counties for a total of 7 counties in our service region.

2. Why does your state/agency offer IFPS?

IFPS State Administrator:
We offer IFPS as part of our federal award for Social Security Title IVB-2 funding. It is primarily offered to “imminent risk” families who have had child protective services involvement, but some referrals are made from mental health and juvenile justice. IFPS is available to all counties in our state.
IFPS Provider A:
The purpose of our program is to prevent unnecessary placement of children away from their families by providing in-home services aimed at restoring families in crisis to an acceptable level of functioning. These services are designed to: stabilize the crisis which put the child at imminent risk, keep the child, family, and community safe by defusing the potential for violence (physical, sexual, emotional/verbal abuse) and help families develop the skills, competencies and resources they need to handle future crisis situations more effectively.Eckerd’s known for “the first name in second chances.” Eckerd believes every child and family deserves a second chance.IFPS Provider B:
The addition of IFPS services to our programming was a natural fit with our agency’s mission of the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. Our agency started in 1997 and had already established prevention/intervention programs. In 2004 we were in need of a model of service that would allow us to expand into treatment. IFPS was the perfect fit for both our mission and our emphasis on a clinical model that would add to our home visitation specialty.

3. What qualities do you want to see in providers of IFPS, both at the agency and at the therapist level?

IFPS State Administrator:
First and foremost, the ability to provide IFPS with fidelity to the model, which is based on Homebuilders®. In addition, the ability to fulfill documentation and reporting requirements.
IFPS Provider A:
Eckerd hires quality people to work as IFPS workers. Staff is required to have a four year degree in the human service field. The worker must be compassionate, non-judgmental, enjoy working with others, be culturally aware, and be able to work in tough situations in a family’s home.IFPS Provider B:
Someone who is able to take each family and their circumstances on their own individual merits. This person should be:

  • respectful yet direct quickly due to the short-term nature of the service
  • able to see the “big picture” and problem solve effectively
  • able to teach in a way that is not lecturing while still being able to present information that is clinical, compassionate and understanding

We look for someone who understands child abuse and neglect, trauma integration, and can impart this information on to the family in a strengths-based manner. We also look for someone who is passionate about our overall mission of child abuse and neglect prevention.

4. What qualities do you look for in an IFPS therapist?

IFPS State Administrator:
Increased safety and stability, improved family functioning and an increase in protective factors
IFPS Provider A:
Positive changes! Families are able to remain intact. Parents learn tools and resources to help them communicate, reward, interact, and positive reinforcement to better their parenting skills. Families are linked with community resources and support systems.IFPS Provider B:
Again, each family is different. The most positive changes we see are: the parents are able to identify areas that need improvement(s), can set goals, make progress towards those goals and ultimately maintain the children in their home without the need for out-of-home placement. While this may look different from family to family, I believe there is potential with all families to achieve these changes.

5. How do you measure success of IFPS services? How successful are IFPS services in your state?

IFPS State Administrator:
We currently use the NCFAS but will soon transition to the NCFAS-G. We also use the FRIENDS Protective Factors Survey. Statewide, at least 80% of families demonstrate improved functioning using these tools. The providers also conduct follow-up at 6 & 12 months after case closure to determine if the family is still safely intact. We don’t have data for this outcome yet.
IFPS Provider A:
Eckerd measures success in our outcomes. We track data and record family progress by administering client satisfaction surveys, client feedback forms, assess whether the family showed improvement in domains measured by the NCFAS pre/post. Eckerd also measures success if the family actively participated and completed the program, and the face to face time requirement was met. Most importantly, if the family remained intact and the child/children did not re-enter foster care within 12 months of case closure.IFPS Provider B:
Ultimately I believe the measure of success of IFPS services is that the parents are able to make positive parenting choices that prevent their children from being placed outside of the home. We do this by setting goals at the beginning of services, working towards these goals during the service, and then assessing progress/challenges made at the end of the service. We believe a parent’s goal plan that shows “ongoing” rather than “achieved” at the end of services is success because it means that parent is working towards achieving their goals. IFPS is really about starting parents on the “AH HA” journey: recognizing the path that led them to this place of crisis, owning the needed changes that must occur, and beginning the steps of making those positive changes. IFPS sheds a light and helps parents take those first steps on this journey. With work come positive outcomes.

6. What advice and resources can you share with other states that want to establish a strong IFPS program?

IFPS State Administrator:
Get support from Homebuilders® and utilize the NCFAS-G. Our state is divided into regions and there is a community-based agency in each region that provides services to all counties therein. This system has worked well for several years.
IFPS Provider A:
Current and frequent trainings offered by the State, agency, or other local trainings are strongly encouraged. They help a program remain current, learn what changes are being made, collaborate and network with other agencies.IFPS Provider B:
Be patient. Be thorough. BE TRAUMA INFORMED!!! Take each family and their individual set of circumstances on their own individual merit. Do not judge. Do not lecture. Counsel. Show compassion. Show understanding.

Contacts:
IFPS State Administrators
Michelle D. Reines
Program Consultant, Child Welfare Services
N.C. Division of Social Services

Heather Bohanan
Supervisor, Performance Management/Reporting and Evaluation Management
N.C. Department of Health and Human Services

IFPS Providers
Mandy Canzonieri  (Provider A)
Manager
Eckerd

Sarah Black  (Provider B)
IFPS Supervisor
Exchange Club (SCAN)

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Posted by Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, National Family Preservation Network

IFPS and Medicaid

In some states, IFPS services are paid through Medicaid. Arizona is one of these states. Arizona has a Medicaid waiver that allows for a wide range of services delivered through our behavioral health system.

Medicaid reimburses the state for IFPS services on a shared cost basis with federal dollars covering most of the cost and the state the balance. Children in foster care automatically qualify for Medicaid. In-home services are covered by Medicaid if the family meets income eligibility requirements.

Medicaid will only pay for specific services so an IFPS intervention is broken down and coded into those services. Typically these services include:

  • Individual Therapy
  • Family Therapy—with or without child
  • Family Support
  • Respite
  • Case Management
  • Living Skills
  • Health Promotion

IFPS providers in Arizona are licensed through behavioral health services. The licensing standards are extensive and the list can be viewed here:
http://www.azdhs.gov/bhs/provider/provider_main.htm

You can see how Medicaid reimburses for IFPS in the following chart which lists the coding number, the description of services, unit of cost, and amount for typical IFPS services:

H2017 Psychosocial rehabilitation living skills training services, per 15 minutes

$23.30

H2025 Ongoing support to maintain employment, per 15 minutes

$9.13

H2027 Psychoeducational service (pre-job training and development), per 15 minutes

$13.08

S5110 Home care training, family (family support), per 15 minutes

$23.30

S5150 Unskilled respite care, not hospice, per 15 minutes

$7.49

S5151 Unskilled respite care, not hospice, per diem

$211.45

T1016 Office case management by behavioral health professional, each 15 minutes

$25.00

T1016 Out of office case management by behavioral health professional, each 15 minutes

$33.74

T1016 Office case management, by BHT, each 15 minutes

$17.50

T1016 Out of office case management, by BHT, each 15 minutes

$23.87

T1019 Personal care service, each 15 minutes

$5.80

H0004 Office, individual behavioral health counseling and therapy, per 15 minutes

$25.00

H0004 Home, individual behavioral health counseling and therapy, per 15 minutes

$33.74

H0004 Group behavioral health counseling and therapy, per 15 minutes

$7.58

H0004 Office, family behavioral health counseling and therapy with client present, per 15 minutes

$25.50

H0004 Out of office, family behavioral health counseling and therapy with client present

$36.85

H0004 Office, family behavioral health counseling and therapy without client present, per 15 minutes

$25.50

H0004 Out of office, family behavioral health counseling and therapy, without client present, per 15 minutes

$36.85

H0025 Behavioral health prevention/promotion education service

$14.00

H0031 Mental health assessment, by non-physician

$140.00

H2011 Crisis intervention service, per 15 minutes

$32.18

H2014 Skills training and development, per 15 minutes

$23.30

H2014 Group skills training and development, per 15 minutes per person

$11.60

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Posted by Anne Cornell, Clinical Consultant, Arizona.
If you have questions or need more information, please contact Anne at mustbinsun@aol.com.

Featured IFPS Program: Louisiana

Louisiana is the second in our series of featured IFPS programs. (See more at Mississippi.) Louisiana began offering intensive family preservation services in the 1990s. It was discontinued due to budget restraints and reinstated in 2007.

We asked the provider, Volunteers of America Greater Baton Rouge, LA, and the Louisiana State Administrator to talk about key elements of their program.

1.How long has your state offered IFPS? Share about the history of IFPS in your state.

IFPS State Administrator:
Louisiana DCFS has offered IFPS since 2007. It was available in the mid-90s; however, it became a casualty of significant budget restraints and was discontinued. It was resurrected post-Katrina in 2007, when funds became available, and has maintained funding each year now that we have data to support its success. Also, in March 2013, the Homebuilders® model of intensive family preservation became a Medicaid covered service, thereby opening it up to more families.
IFPS Provider:
We started in 1990 with a federal grant. In 1991, we started contracting with the State through OCS, later renamed to DCFS, to provide intensive home-based prevention and reunification services, based on the Homebuilders® model.

2. Why does your state/agency offer IFPS?

IFPS State Administrator:

  • It’s ultimately about safety! If we can prevent a child from coming into custody and safely maintaining them in their own home (now and in the future without repeat maltreatment), the savings to the state is significant and the “emotional savings” to the child and family are immeasurable.
  • Removal of a child from the home can be very traumatizing, even if placed in the best of foster homes. By intervening quickly, we can diffuse a crisis situation and teach the family new skills in order to keep the child safe in the home.
  • The State is also focusing on reducing the number of children in foster care and making sure they have safe and permanent homes. Homebuilders® allows a child to return to their home environment by placing extra supports to smooth the transition, increasing stability in the placement. Referrals to Homebuilders® are also encouraged to stabilize a foster home placement, thereby reducing the number of placement changes and disruptions for the child.
IFPS Provider:

  • We believe that families are more interested and more capable of change during times of crisis and that families can, with help, learn healthier, more nurturing ways of responding to family members, including their children.
  • The Homebuilders® model emphasizes community networking, family advocacy and skills building to increase family self-sufficiency and improve family living.

3. What qualities do you want to see in providers of IFPS, both at the agency and at the therapist level?

IFPS State Administrator:
The Provider/Therapist would have to have:

  • a clear understanding of safety,
  • an ability to teach skills in a motivating and encouraging manner,
  • apply a collaborative approach with the agency and community providers,
  • have a belief in families and their ability to make changes,
  • flexibility to work with all ages and “issues”,
  • availability (24/7 including evenings and weekends),
  • appreciation and respect for diversity and
  • an ability to be engaging with families, seeing them as partners in the process.

All levels of the organization need to be “on board” when it comes to adhering to the Homebuilders® model. From the Therapist to the Program Supervisor and the Program Manager, all need to understand and implement the model with fidelity.

IFPS Provider:
The Provider/Therapist is someone:

  • with good therapeutic skills,
  • who understands the philosophy that families are best served in their homes where intervention happens in real-life situations,
  • who is very flexible and available to see clients when it is convenient for them, rather than the therapist,
  • who is non-judgmental about working with parents who have abused their children,
  • who is a “people” person.

4. What qualities do you look for in an IFPS therapist?

IFPS State Administrator:

  • Life changing transformation in behavior, thoughts, and actions from even the most challenging of family circumstances has occurred.
  • It’s amazing what families can accomplish when they are guided, given the skills and encouragement, and are linked with supports in the community.
  • The feedback surveys are overwhelmingly positive and “glowing” with praise for the program and thanks for giving them this chance to make improvements.
IFPS Provider:
See #3.

5. How do you measure success of IFPS services? How successful are IFPS services in your state?

IFPS State Administrator:
Success is measured by:

  • improved NCFAS ratings,
  • family satisfaction surveys,
  • child safety (whether the child comes into care or is reunified—as long as they are not re-victimized),
  • success at closure (for example, did the family complete the full intervention without dropping out or having a removal), and
  • avoidance of repeat maltreatment within 6 months of the closure date of IFPS.

Homebuilders® is an integral part of our family services menu and is regarded as highly successful in maintaining families safely.

IFPS Provider:
In baby steps often. Indicators we look for:

  • Parents are receptive to suggestions
  • Parents put the new skills into practice
  • Decreased yelling
  • Less fear in the children
  • Parents are not using physical punishment
  • No additional CPS reports for a period of 6 months to at least a year

6. What advice and resources can you share with other states that want to establish a strong IFPS program?

IFPS State Administrator:

  • We recommended that states use a research based model, such as Homebuilders®, and provide oversight to ensure it is followed with integrity and fidelity.
  • Having a State “coordinator” is helpful as this contact person can coordinate trainings for all providers (date, location) as well as conduct Provider meetings to collaborate, problem solve and share successes.
  • For Louisiana, we have access to the Online Data Management (ODM) system where all Homebuilders® data is stored for our families so we can run current statewide data (from a therapist level to a program level to a statewide level) as well as link that system data with our agency system data to check for repeat maltreatment.
IFPS Provider:

  • We use the Homebuilders® model and use the assistance and training provided by the Institute for Family Development (IFD).
  • Coordinate at the state level to evaluate the level of need for this service in your area.
  • Develop a clear agency financial model for providing this service.
  • If you have more questions, you can reach me at 225-928-9398.

Contacts:
IFPS State Administrator
Nell Aucoin
DCFS Child Welfare
Prevention and Family Services
Baton Rouge, LA

IFPS Provider
Raylene McKinnon
Director of Child and Family Services
Volunteers of America Greater Baton Rouge, LA

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Posted by Peg Marckworth

Featured IFPS Program: Mississippi

Mississippi has offered intensive family preservation services since 1992.

We asked the provider, Mississippi Children’s Home Services and the State Administrator to talk about key elements of their program.

Why does your state offer IFPS?

IFPS State Administrator:
It offers IFPS services to prevent the removal of children from their home setting due to abuse, neglect, etc.
IFPS Provider:
Mississippi Children’s Home Services (MCHS) recognizes the importance of family preservation services as a part of a service continuum to help families remain together and to prevent children from entering foster care, when they can be safely maintained at home.

How long has your state offered IFPS?—share about the history of IFPS in your state.

IFPS State Administrator:

  • Mississippi’s intensive family preservation services began in 1992 as a pilot project in one county with two contract employees.
  • It expanded to all counties in 1996.
  • Between 1999 and 2007 the positions were state service.
  • In 2007 the services were once again outsourced.
  • Currently, we have one Provider that provides the service to all 82 counties.
IFPS Provider:

  • The Mississippi Department of Human Services (MDHS) provided family preservation services in-house from 1995–2006.
  • Mississippi Children’s Home Services (MCHS), applied and was awarded the contract for Family Preservation in 2006, when MDHS first outsourced the service.
  • MCHS has continued to provide family preservation services and in 2010, was awarded the contract for Comprehensive Family Support Services Program (CFSSP), which included family preservation and reunification services.
  • MCHS is the sole provider of CFSSP for the state.

What qualities do you want to see in providers of IFPS both at the agency and at the therapist level?

IFPS State Administrator:
We would look for competence, stability, values, a commitment to the families served, and a provider who has similar views on child abuse prevention, etc.
IFPS Provider:Question not applicable

What qualities do you look for in an IFPS therapist?

IFPS State Administrator:Question not applicable IFPS Provider:
We look for therapists who are:

  • committed to preserving the family unit
  • understand that this is a time-limited intensive program and can stay focused on the family goals and treatment needs
  • build on the family’s strengths and recognize that the family is a key resource for change.
  • MCHS also seeks therapists who are able to learn and apply evidenced based models and interventions in practice.

What changes do you see in families that receive IFPS?

IFPS State Administrator:

  • Most of the families learn to maintain on their own without future assistance from the agency.
  • They are driven to keep their children safe, and use the skills taught to them so that further issues concerning abuse/neglect do not arise.
  • They are confident, have more positive interactions within their families; and are more positive in their outlook on life.
IFPS Provider:
Families who by the end of the intervention:

  • communicate effectively with each other
  • know who their support systems are in the community
  • parents have realistic expectations of their children
  • improved marital relationships
  • improved and appropriate disciplinary techniques
  • better income management skills
  • better home management skills
  • more respect among all family members

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Posted by Peg Marckworth

Information provided by:
Carolyn Cotton Bland, Mississippi Division of Family and Children’s Services
Elizabeth Frizsell, Mississippi Children’s Home Services